Search Me!

Sunday, May 31, 2009

Musing Monday (June 1)

This weekly event is hosted by Just One More Page.
Today’s MUSING MONDAYS post is about sticking with it…
How much time (or how many pages) do you give a book that you aren't really enjoying before you'll set it aside? If you're reading it for a book group discussion, or for review, will you give it more of a chance then, say, a book you're reading for your own interest? Why, or why not? (courtesy of MizB)

I usually can find one or two redeeming qualities about a book that will allow me to finish it without having my brains leak out of my ears. One of my favorite methods is imagining my favorite actor as the lead male character in the novel. When that fails, I usually give it till the middle of the book. If by the middle, the book has not engaged my interest even a little, I put it away.
If the book is for a book discussion or review, I definitely give it more of a chance and I will make an effort to finish it. I feel, that especially if it is for review, there is some sort of responsibility there. If it is really that bad that I cannot make myself finish it no matter how hard I try, and I have had one of these yet, I will review it to the best of my ability with a notice that I was unable to finish it and perhaps it would be a better read for someone else.
On more positive news, the Sims 3 comes out this week. I can’t wait.

Thursday, May 28, 2009

20 Books in 2009 Challenge Completed!

Yipee! I finished a challenge. Never though this day would come. I am so proud of myself. Here is my list:

1.Mansfield Park-Jane Austen
2.Northanger Abbey-Jane Austen
3. A Fortunate Age-Joanna Smith Rakoff
4.Houston, We Have A Problema-Gwendolyn Zepeda
5.Mr and Mrs Fitzwilliam Darcy: Two Shall Become One-Sharon Lathan
6.Galway Bay-Mary Pat Kelly
7Playing With Grown-Ups-Sophie Dahl
8.Pemberley Manor-Kathryn L. Nelson
9.Flannery-Brad Gooch
10.The Traitor’s Wife-Susan Higginbotham
11.Palace Circle-Rebecca Dean
12.Sundays at Tiffany’s-James Patterson
13. The Four Corners of the Sky-Michael Malone
14.The Talisman Ring-Georgette Heyer
15. Why Shoot A Butler?-Georgette Heyer
16.A Girl’s Guide to Modern European Philosophy-Charlotte Greig
17.Who Do You Think You Are?-Alyse Myers
18. The Cradle-Patrick Somerville
19. Life is Like a Line-Cynthia M. Sabotka
20.The Only True Genius in the Family-Jennie Nash
21. Living A Charmed Life-Victoria Moran

The Only True Genius in the Family by Jennie Nash

The Only True Genius in the Family

Publisher: Berkley Trade
ISBN: 0425225755
Pages: 304 pgs
Genre: Contemporary Fiction
Challenges-Read’n’Review Challenge, 100+ Reading Challenge
Rating:   


Summary from Publisher:

Though she lives in the shadow of her legendary landscape photographer father, and is the mother of a painter whose career is about to take off, Claire has carved out a practical existence as a commercial photographer. Her pictures may not be the stuff of genius, but they’ve paid for a good life.

But when her father dies, Claire loses faith in the work she has devoted her life to—and worse, begins to feel jealous of her daughter’s success. Then, as she helps prepare a retrospective of her famous father’s photographs, Claire uncovers revelations about him that change everything she believes about herself as a mother, a daughter, and an artist…

My Review:

I really liked this novel. A lot. I started this book dismissing it as chick lit but the book I read was much different and much deeper.

I had so much sympathy for Claire. I know what it feels like to feel like you are lacking compared to others. I could imagine the anguish she must have felt believing her father, who she always wanted the approval of, loved her less because she was not as gifted and artistic as he would have liked her to be. I understand her feelings in way that I did not think that I would.

The origin of genius and talent is also something I have never thought of before and I found it pretty interesting when I did. Is genius genetic or is it learned? I don’t know. My dad is a genius in math and both my sister and I are veritable dunces when it comes to math. But then again, my father is an engineer and I managed to gain his talent for computers and technology. I also gained my love for reading from my mother. So, I do think that these forms of aptitude can be genetic but that genius can’t be learned is, I think, false.

As you can tell, this book made me think. I was struck by this book and I was surprised about how much. It was very well written. The characters were great. The only character that I did not like was Bailey. She seemed to be temperamental, bratty and overly critical of her mother. She seemed to look down on Claire. I think she was part of the reason for Claire’s inferiority complex. I wanted to see more of Harrison. He was such a good guy.

I really liked this book and think you will as well. Especially if you are looking for an introspective novel masquerading as chick lit.
*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review. My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the blog.
mysig

Booking Through Thursday (May 28th)

Weekly event from Booking Through Thursday
Is there a book that you wish you could “unread”? One that  you disliked so thoroughly you wish you could just forget that you ever read it?
Oh boy, yes. So far most of my review books have escaped this but some other books I have read have fallen into this “please let me forget it” section of my brain.
       1. Catcher in the Rye-I hated it. From the moment I started to the last page. Holden was such an obnoxious character. Yuck. I want to wash my brain of the memory.
       2. All of Dan Brown’s books-I can’t come up with the words to describe how much I hate all of his books. His writing makes me cringe.
       3. A Fortunate Age-I keep coming back to this one because I had such high expectations when I started for it all to go kerplunk.
I think those are my major ones. The lesser ones, I can live with keeping them in my memory.

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Life is Like A Line by Cynthia M. Sabotka

Life is Like a Line - A Memoir of Moods, Medication, and Mania
Publisher: Silver Lining Publishing
ISBN: 0979779200
Pages: 336 pgs
Genre: Memoir
Challenges-Read’n’Review Challenge, 100+ Reading Challenge
Rating:   


 Summary from Publisher:

"Life Is Like a Line" is the eloquent journey into the mind of an individual suffering since childhood from a mood disorder that has preyed on her emotions and affected her in every conceivable way.

Frequently exhilarated, often violently angry, and nearly constantly terrified, high achiever Cynthia Sabotka has spent her life running, nearly always at full speed. For most of her life, she had no idea what she was running from. With suicidal ideation leading her ever closer to the brink of disaster, Cynthia embarked upon a journey of discovery. A determined psychiatrist, medication, and therapy ultimately saved her life, as well as her marriage. After several false starts and medication side effects so debilitating many individuals would have given up rather than endure them, she learned that she can live life on the line.

Life on the line means Cynthia lives a stable, rational, emotionally predictable life, rather than soaring maniacally above the line, where she drives faster, talks louder, and takes appallingly dangerous risks, or plummeting below the line, where she hides, nearly paralyzed with terror and confusion, in the sanctuary of her bedroom. Complicated by family members and a family history as complex as they come. Life Is Like a Line is ultimately the memoir of one woman s triumph over the myriad forces that inexplicably but inevitably worked to bring her to the brink of despair and disaster.

Engrossing and enlightening, it offers an intimate peek into a fascinating mind and its triumph over itself.

My Review:

I expected to have a difficult time getting into this book. I was afraid that it was going to have a lot of medical terminology and jargon and that stuff goes right over my head. Anyone who knows me knows that science is my weak point. I was so thankful that this book turned out to be more of a memoir and a family history.

Life is Like a Line really brings you into Sabotka’s family, through her eyes. Sabotka gives a intriguing family history through her use of elegant prose and journal entries. I really loved the journal entries. They made the story more real and less clinical than it could have been. I almost wish that there had been more of them. Although at points, I did find that the prose and journal entries seemed a bit disjointed and the transitions between them could have been smoother. This, however, did not detract from the overall reading experience much. Otherwise, Life is Like a Line is beautifully written. Sabotka’s writing style brought me into the story. I couldn’t have put it down if I tried.

This book really did help me learn more about bipolar disorder. It gave it a name and a face whereas before it was just a vague idea. I admired Cynthia’s strength and determination. She never wavered and I really respect that. It was probably her strength that attracted me to this book and kept me interested.

I would recommend this book to anyone looking for a better understanding of bipolar disorder and for an engaging story about a strong and intelligent woman.

*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review. My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the blog.
mysig

Monday, May 25, 2009

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? (May 25th)

Hosted by J. Kaye @ J. Kaye’s Book Blog
I did not realize how much school held up my reading until I looked at this list. I’m still slower than I would normally be but eventually I hope to be back to normal reading speed.
Reviews Up:
A Girl's Guide to Modern European Philosophy-Charlotte Greig
Who Do You Think You Are?-Alyse Myers
The Cradle-Patrick Somerville
The Talisman Ring-Georgette Heyer
Why Shoot A Butler-Georgette Heyer

Books Completed:
Scranton’s Mayors-David Wenzel
Life is Like A Line-Cynthia M. Sabotka
The Only True Genius in the Family-Jennie Nash

Currently Reading (in order):
My Lord John-Georgette Heyer
The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane-Katherine Howe
Living A Charmed Life-Victoria Moran
All of Me-Lori Wilde
A Gentle Rain-Deborah Smith
A Worthy Legacy-Tomi Akinyanmi

Up Next:
Drood-Dan Simmons
The Girl She Used to Be-David Cristofano
Healing Luke-Beth Cornelison
The Darcys and the the Bingleys-Marhsa Altman
The Plight of the Darcy Brothers-Marsha Altman
My Cousin Caroline-Rebecca Ann Collins
Darcy and Anne-Judith Brocklehurst
Apologize, Apologize-Elizabeth Kelly
Great Expectations: The Graphic Novel
The Lacemakers of Glenmara-Heather Barbieri

Sunday, May 24, 2009

Musing Monday (May 25th)

This weekly event is hosted by Just One More Page.

Today’s MUSING MONDAYS post is about gift certificates…

Do you give gift certificates to book stores as presents? If so, do you give for actual stores or online stores? Do you like to receive them yourself?

I always give gift certificates to Borders to my friends and family as presents. With my friends and family, it is a pretty safe bet that they will get some good use out of it. Borders cards can be used both online and in store so it is convenient for everybody. I love to receive them myself. I look forward to every holiday because I can depend that someone will get me one. Although this year for my birthday I might ask my parents to buy me new bookshelves. They are starting to look kind bedraggled.

Friday, May 22, 2009

The Cradle by Patrick Somerville

The Cradle: A Novel
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
ISBN: 0316036129
Pages: 208 pgs
Genre: Contemporary Fiction
Challenges-Read’n’Review Challenge, 100+ Reading Challenge
Rating:   


 Summary from Publisher:

Early one summer morning, Matthew Bishop kisses his still-sleeping wife Marissa, gets dressed and eases his truck through Milwaukee, bound for the highway. His wife, pregnant with their first child, has asked him to find the antique cradle taken years before by her mother Caroline when she abandoned Marissa, never to contact her daughter again. Soon to be a mother herself, Marissa now dreams of nothing else but bringing her baby home to the cradle she herself slept in. His wife does not know-does not want to know-where her mother lives, but Matt has an address for Caroline's sister near by and with any luck, he will be home in time for dinner.

Only as Matt tries to track down his wife's mother, he discovers that Caroline, upon leaving Marissa, has led a life increasingly plagued by impulse and irrationality, a mysterious life that grows more inexplicable with each new lead Matt gains, and door he enters. As hours turn into days and Caroline's trail takes Matt from Wisconsin to Minnesota, Illinois, and beyond in search of the cradle, Matt makes a discovery that will forever change Marissa's life, and faces a decision that will challenge everything he has ever known.

Elegant and astonishing, Patrick Somerville tells the story of one man's journey into the heart of marriage, parenthood, and what it means to be a family. Confirming the arrival of an exuberantly talented new writer, THE CRADLE is an uniquely imaginative debut novel that radiates with wisdom and wonder.

My Review:

The Cradle by Patrick Somerville is definitely a worthy read. The characters are well-drawn and the story is intriguing. I read this book in one two hour commute, so, it is a very quick read and a good distraction.

The Cradle consists of two different storylines that weave together. One story follows Matt who is searching for his wife’s long lost cradle and the other is about Renee as she deals with her son’s decision to enlist in the military.  Both stories weave together seamlessly. I really love this type of format. It creates an element of surprise and definitely makes the story more interesting and memorable. These two stories flow really well towards the end but it does take quite a while for the two stories to attain any form of cohesiveness. The beginning seems like two completely different books. I think this works well for this book because it makes the ending come as much more of a surprise. If the book had been longer than its 200 pages it might have become a problem but because of the novel’s length, it did not.

I had really strong reactions to most of the characters. That is usually how I judge the books I read and these characters definitely elicited some very strong reactions. I loved Matt and Joe. They were such sweet characters. I was sad that Joe was given so little screen time. I wanted to strangle Marissa. She seemed to me like a spoiled little girl who was finally given a chance to be as demanding and annoying as she wanted because of her pregnancy. Honestly, if you want your cradle so bad go and get it yourself. Or at least go with your poor husband.

The writing was generally really good. I did find however that the dialogue was a bit clunky at at times but generally not enough to become really noticeable. Also the language in the novel as a whole more than made up for it.
*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review. My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the blog.
mysig

Thursday, May 21, 2009

Booking Through Thursday (May 21)

What book would you love to be able to read again for the first time?

This is a wonderful question. There are three books that if I could take a time machine and read them again for the first time, I would.
1. Little Women-This was the first “big people” book I ever read and I would love to go back and relive the magic of my first novel again. Aside from it being my first, it was a completely beautiful book and another first time with that book would be lovely.
2. Galway Bay-Mary Pat Kelly and Who Do You Think You Are?-Alyse Myers-I was not expecting to find  non-classics that would be among the list but I find that these two books are. I would love to be able to go back to a point in time where I did not know about these books so I could read them again. They were beautiful.
3. All of Jane Austen’s books-I would love to go back to the point in time before I understood the magic of Jane Austen’s books. It was a special moment in my life and I would love to relive it.

Who Do You Think You Are? by Alyse Myers

Who Do You Think You Are?: A Memoir

Publisher: Touchstone
ISBN: 1416543066
Pages: 272 pgs
Genre: Memoir
Challenges-Read’n’Review Challenge, 100+ Reading Challenge
Rating:



Please prepare yourselves for a gushing review. I apologize in advance.

Summary from publisher:

After her mother's death, Alyse Myers covets only one thing: a wooden box that sits in the back of a closet. Its contents have been kept from her for her entire life. When she was thirteen years old her mother promised she could have the box, "when I'm dead. In fact, it'll be my present to you."

Growing up in Queens in the 1960s and '70s, Alyse always yearned for more in life, while her mother settled for an unhappy marriage, an unsatisfying job, and ultimately a joyless existence. Her father drifts in and out of their home. There are harrowing fights, abject cruelty, and endless uncertainty. Throughout her childhood Alyse adamantly rejects everything about her mother's lifestyle, leaving her mother to ask "Who do you think you are?"

A personal portrait of a mother and daughter, Who Do You Think You Are? explores the profound and poignant revelations that so often can come to light only after a parent has died. Balancing childhood memories with adult observations, Alyse Myers creates a riveting and deeply moving narrative.

My Review:


What can I possibly say about this book that would adequately express how much I loved reading it? It is not the type of book that you will say “Wow! I really loved that book” but you will become engrossed in Alyse’s story. You will be unable to put the book down and it will take awhile to fade from your memory. I love books like this. Books that even a week after you finish, you can still recall even minor details. This type of book happens very rarely and I am glad I was given a chance to read it.

Who Do You Think You Are? is a wonderful book. There is not much more I can say than that. The writing is perfect. Alyse Myers does a wonderful job of bringing her story to life. I am amazed at how she can remember so much. I can barely remember yesterday much less my childhood. Most of my childhood memories seem as if they happened underwater when I try and recall them. Alyse, as a child, teenager and adult, was a completely engaging character. I loved reading about her family, as well.

I think we all can see some of ourselves and our childhoods in Alyse’s story. One particularly striking moment for me was when Alyse was less than pleased that her she had a new sister. I did almost the exact same thing. When my little sister was brought home, I was two years old. I walked up to my mother and asked “What is it and when is it leaving?” When they said that she was here forever, I ran downstairs to my grandmother’s and did not return for a week.

I would recommend this book to just about everyone. It is that good. I am passing this on to my sister and mother because I know they would love it, too.

Please go to Alyse’s website to view an excerpt from the book, a video of Alyse’s interview on The View and other articles, and contact information.
*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review. My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the blog.
mysig

Monday, May 18, 2009

The Talisman Ring by Georgette Heyer

The Talisman Ring

Publisher: Sourcebooks Casablanca
ISBN: 1402217714
Pages: 320 pgs
Genre: Romance/Regency
Challenges-Read’n’Review Challenge, 100+ Reading Challenge
Rating: 


Summary from publisher:

The Talisman Ring is one of Heyer's funniest and fastest-paced romantic comedies, telling the story of a fugitive heir, a tempestuous Frenchwoman, and the two sensible people who try to keep them out of trouble.

"... A long-lost family heirloom, a young heir falsely accused of murder, a band of smugglers, two utterly delightful Heyer heroines, a taciturn, but highly resourceful older gentleman - all play their parts in a tale funny enough to have you laughing aloud."

My Review:

This is one of the few Heyer novels I managed to skip over when I bought the rest of her works. Don’t ask me why I skipped it, I don’t know. I do things that surprise me at times.

I really loved this novel. It had it all…comedy, mystery and romance. It was as perfect as perfect can get without becoming obnoxious. The characters were awesome. I especially loved Sir Tristram Shield and Miss Sarah Thane. I had such a crush on Tristram. He is almost in the league of Severus Snape and Mr. Darcy in the group of my literary crushes. He was so much smarter than everyone else. He was always at least ten steps ahead of everyone else. If I was Eustacie, I would have married him in a split second. I also really liked Sarah. She was so smart. She had her head firmly on her shoulders. I really love strong, intelligent female characters. The dialogue was sharp  and witty.  Without giving anything away, the proposal scene at the end was hilarious. This was a great hybrid… regency romance mixed with mystery mixed with comedy. I found that those three elements really worked together well.

I did find, however, that the story got a bit weak at times. Not often but enough that I noticed it and only for a chapter or two. I found that this generally happened when Ludovic and Eustacie were the main focus. I couldn’t stand Eustacie. She was so flighty and insipid. Definitely not my sort of character. I didn’t like Ludovic either but I didn’t want to bash my head into a wall when he was around. This couple did not have the charm or grace that Tristram and Sarah had.

The Talisman Ring would be a great for a Heyer fan that has already exhausted the other Heyer Regency romances and is looking for something a bit different. This might not be the best intro to Heyer but for a veteran, it’s a great read.

Sourcebooks also does a great job of re-issuing these Heyer books. The cover design is really pretty and reflects the novel perfectly.
*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review. My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the blog.
mysig

Why Shoot A Butler? by Georgette Heyer

Why Shoot a Butler?

Publisher: Sourcebooks Landmark
ISBN: 1402217951
Pages: 336 pgs
Genre: Mystery
Challenges-Read’n’Review Challenge, 100+ Reading Challenge
Rating: 


 Summary from Publisher:

Every family has secrets, but the Fountains' are turning deadly…

On a dark night, along a lonely country road, barrister Frank Amberley stops to help a young lady in distress and discovers a sports car with a corpse behind the wheel. The girl protests her innocence, and Amberley believes her—at least until he gets drawn into the mystery and the clues incriminating Shirley Brown begin to add up…

In an English country-house murder mystery with a twist, it's the butler who's the victim, every clue complicates the puzzle, and the bumbling police are well-meaning but completely baffled. Fortunately, in ferreting out a desperate killer, amateur sleuth Amberley is as brilliant as he is arrogant, but this time he's not sure he wants to know the truth…

My Review:

I have absolutely no experience with mysteries. None whatsoever. I have had Agatha Christie’s books on my shelves for years but have never touched them even though I keep telling myself I should. I figured that if I was going to skip over Agatha I might as well start with Georgette Heyer. She is, after all, the regency author I love the most after Jane Austen.

I was a bit apprehensive when I picked this up that I would miss some of the nuances that other readers more familiar with this type of mystery might pick up on. That was not the case. I found Why Shoot A Butler? to be a witty and funny novel. It seemed to be a satire. I loved the humor and sarcasm. It took me a few pages to catch on to the humor but I finally did. I thought that Frank Amberley and Shirley Brown were awesome characters. Their interplay was amazing and enough to keep me interested in the novel. There were also a bunch of twists and turns and surprises.

There were points in the middle of the novel that I sort of lost interest in the story and the mystery. I found my mind wandering as I was reading. That rarely happens with me. The interest returned in the last bit of the book but I can’t help but feel that the middle section of the novel was a bit weak for me. It could also be because I was reading this part of the book on the subway, during rush hour, on a Friday. This is a novel that should be read on a comfy chair, drinking a cup of hot tea and preferably, with as little noise as possible.

The Sourcebooks edition is really great. It is a smaller edition. Almost like a little pocket paperback. The cover image is also really beautiful. Sourcebooks is doing a really great job bringing back this Georgette Heyer books.


*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review. My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the blog. mysig

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? (May 18th)

Hosted by J. Kaye @ J. Kaye’s Book Blog
Completed:
The Cradle-Patrick Somerville
Scranton’s Mayors-David J. Wenzel
Reading (in this order):
Life is Like A Line-Cynthia M. Sabotka
Who Do You Think You Are?-Alyse Myers
My Lord John-Georgette Heyer
All of Me-Lori Wilde
Up Next:
The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane-Katherine Howe
The Only True Genius in the Family-Jennie Nash
Drood-Dan Simmons
A Worthy Legacy-Tomi Akinyanmi
My Lord John-Georgette Heyer
The Girl She Used to Be-David Cristofano
A Gentle Rain-Deborah Smith
Healing Luke-Beth Cornelison
The Darcys and the the Bingleys-Marhsa Altman
The Plight of the Darcy Brothers-Marsha Altman
My Cousin Caroline-Rebecca Ann Collins
Darcy and Anne-Judith Brocklehurst
Apologize, Apologize-Elizabeth Kelly
Great Expectations: The Graphic Novel
The Lacemakers of Glenmara-Heather Barbieri

Sunday, May 17, 2009

Musing Monday (May18th)

This weekly event is hosted by Just One More Page.
Today’s MUSING MONDAYS post is about early reading…
Do you remember how you developed a love for reading? Was it from a particular person, or person(s)? Do you remember any books that you read, or were read to  you, as a young child? (question courtesy of Diane)
I developed a love for reading very early in life. When I was a kid, maybe 2 or 3, my mother, my sister and I would hang out on my mother’s bed and wait for my father to come home from work. That time was usually spent reading. My mother would usually be reading her romance novels, my sister doing a puzzle of some sort, and I would be reading whatever book series I was obsessed with at that time. Usually the Babysitter’s Club or Sweet Valley High. On other rare days, I would read an X-Men comic because I had an obsession with Wolverine. Still do but for different reasons. I credit my mother with my love for reading and for books. Without those afternoons, I don’t know if my love for reading would have ever developed to the level that it did. It is associated with comfort in my mind mainly because of all that time I got to spend with my mother when I was younger.

Thursday, May 14, 2009

A Girl’s Guide to Modern European Philosophy by Charlotte Greig

A Girl's Guide to Modern European PhilosophyPublisher: Other Press
ISBN:1590513177
Pages: 228 pgs
Genre: Contemporary Fiction
Challenges-Read’n’Review Challenge, 100+ Reading Challenge, 20 in 2009
Rating: 



 Summary from Publisher:

Susannah’s official boyfriend, Jason, is the perfect foil for her student lifestyle. He is ten years older, an antiques dealer, and owns a stylish apartment that prevents her from having to live in the seedy digs on campus. This way, she can take her philosophy major very seriously and dabble in the social and sexual freedom of 1970s university life. But circumstances become more complicated than Susannah would like when she begins to have an affair with her tutorial partner, Rob. Soon she is dating two men, missing her lectures, exploring independence and feminism with her girlfriends, and finding herself in a particularly impossible dilemma: she becomes pregnant. Forced to look beyond her friends and lovers for support, she finds help and inspiration from the lessons of Kierkegaard and other European philosophers.

A Girl’s Guide to Modern European Philosophy is a delightfully insightful, bittersweet coming-of-age romp, in which love is far from platonic and the mind—body predicament a pressing reality. It even succeeds where many introductions to philosophy have failed, by effortlessly bringing to life the central tenets of the most important European philosophers of modern times.




My Review:

I was thoroughly surprised by how much I enjoyed reading A Girl’s Guide. The writing was excellent, the structure was impeccable. It was a genuinely amazing read. It was one of those that I literally sat down for about two hours and read straight through.

One of the biggest draws to this novel is the main character, Susannah. She is a normal girl. She is moderately intelligent, attractive and has a supremely annoying boyfriend. She also had a supreme lack of confidence and an ability to be quite indecisive. I think any girl in her late teens, early 20s could identify with that. I want her to do well. I want her to succeed. I really want her to dump those two dunderheads she is involved with. Susannah is one of the elements that make this novel truly worth a read.

The way the novel was structured was interesting and unique. I love that the novel was organized by which book Susannah was reading for her modern philosophy class. It really incorporates the philosophy in an interesting way without overpowering the reader with philosophic thought and theory. It sort of reminded me of Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl (one of my favorite novels). I think I may actually prefer this a bit more.

I tried to find a flaw with this novel and seriously couldn’t find any in the novel itself. The only thing I could think of that I didn’t really like is the cover. To me, at least, it gives the impression of a frothy, beach-type read and that is not what A Girl’s Guide is. If that is my only criticism then the book must be good.


*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review. My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the blog.
mysig
 

Blog Template by In Between Design Studio