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Friday, July 29, 2011

Review: Before Versailles by Karleen Koen

Publisher: Crown
ISBN: 0307716570
Pages:480 pages
Genre: Historical Fiction/French  
Challenges-100+ Reading Challenge, Outdo Yourself Reading Challenge
Buy this Book: Amazonclip_image001_thumb_thumb, Powell's, Indiebound clip_image0013_thumb_thumbclip_image0014_thumb_thumb



Summary from publisher:

Louis XIV is one of the best-known monarchs ever to grace the French throne. But what was he like as a young man—the man before Versailles?

After the death of his prime minister, Cardinal Mazarin, twenty-two-year-old Louis steps into governing France. He’s still a young man, but one who, as king, willfully takes everything he can get—including his brother’s wife. As the love affair between Louis and Princess Henriette burns, it sets the kingdom on the road toward unmistakable scandal and conflict with the Vatican. Every woman wants him. He must face what he is willing to sacrifice for love.

But there are other problems lurking outside the chateau of Fontainebleau: a boy in an iron mask has been seen in the woods, and the king’s finance minister, Nicolas Fouquet, has proven to be more powerful than Louis ever thought—a man who could make a great ally or become a dangerous foe . . .

Meticulously researched and vividly brought to life by the gorgeous prose of Karleen Koen, Before Versailles dares to explore the forces that shaped an iconic king and determined the fate of an empire.

My Review: 

I am a complete and utter sucker for anything French history. I have always been fascinated by the subject. I was thrilled to read and review this between cupcake batches this week.

Louis XIV is one historical character that I always either love or want to throttle with a blunt object depending on my mood and how he is portrayed. I was caught in between in this one. I thought Koen did a great job in portraying him so I think it was just the general persona of his character that made me want to bludgeon him. I loved this historical detail. It was rich and it was well researched.

I loved so much about this book. I loved this historic details, I loved the richness of the descriptions and the realistic portrayal of all the characters. I also enjoyed that this book was not solely focused on the scandals, mistresses and drama. It had some great historical foundation.   I did feel a disconnect with some of the characters. Like they never really got a chance to develop a voice. But overall, I am a history fanatic and that’s what really mattered.

Rating:

*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review.   My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies   made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the  blog.

Friday Events (July 29th)


 
Cupcake of the week: Black Forest Cake, Salted Caramel, Butterscotch

Baking for Fun: Firewhiskey Cupcakes (Cinnamon cake and whiskey buttercream), The Slytherin (Dark Chocolate cupcake with Crème de Menthe—or maybe absinthe), The Severus Snape (Dark Chocolate with a Chocolate Scotch Buttercream)


Reviews posted this week:

  1. In Her Wake by Nancy Rappaport
  2. Savor the Danger by Lori Foster
  3. The Soldier by Grace Burrowes
  4. Anthropology of an American Girl by Hilary Thayer Hamann
  5. The Ghost of Greenwich Village by Lorna Graham
  6. What A Goddess Wants by Stephanie Julian
  7. The Secret Lives of People in Love by Simon Van Booy
  8. Before Versailles by Karleen Koen


 

This week's question is:

Q. Let's step away from books for a second and get personal. What T-Shirt slogan best describes you?

There are two. One for when I am not baking and have a tantrum and want something yummy:

Keep Calm and Have a Cupcake

And then when that fails and there is a baking disaster and I have a tantrum:

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Book Blogger Hop

This Week’s Hop
Not posted yet

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Character Envy: If you could be one character from a book, who would you choose & why?

I don’t know really. I think I would have too pick  Katniss from the Hunger Games, Clary from the Mortal Instruments series or Rose from Vampire Academy. I loved  Katniss simply because she was so kickass. I want to see the movie simply because I want to see her kickass live…not for the boys that they casted as Peeta and Gale. I don’t care what you say and how good the actors were in their previous roles, they are not Peeta and Gale. Look at those pictures! Ugh. I picked Rose because she’s spunky, smart and kickass on the same level as Katniss. I picked Clary because she was not like a certain vampire loving brunette and did not become a droid when she fell in love.

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Review: What A Goddess Wants by Stephanie Julian

Publisher: Sourcebooks Casablanca
ISBN: 1402251475
Pages:304 pages
Genre: Romance/Paranormal
Challenges-100+ Reading Challenge, Outdo Yourself Reading Challenge
Buy this Book: Amazonclip_image001_thumb_thumb, Powell's, Indiebound clip_image0013_thumb_thumbclip_image0014_thumb_thumb



Summary from publisher:

It's OK no one remembers Etruscan Sun goddess Tessa. But when a demon threatens her life, she must turn to mythology's darkest warrior for protection...

Caligo of the Cimmerians has never met a woman as warm, sunny and inviting as Tessa. Their sizzling mutual attraction quickly sweeps the two of them into a love story that's worthy of the gods...

My Review:

I read this one during the Epic Baking Week. I did not expect to like it very much but I thought it would be good for a few chuckles. Turns out, I am a complete moron and this book was excellent. I guess when you judge a book by the cover…Get it. Tee Hee.

Tessa aka Thesan, the Etruscan Goddess of the Dawn was an amazing character.  She was a goddess yet she was so normal and so likeable. Caligo, a Cimmerian (Yes like Conan) was the typical protective warrior man full of machismo and alphaness.  I thought that the chemistry between Tessa and Cal was amazing. I didn’t really like that they just jumped into bed but their relationship developed very nicely after that.

I was obsessed with mythology when I was a kid. I used to tote around an encyclopedia of world myths everywhere. Even church. I do believe that I got in trouble for that. I don’t remember most of what I read but the interest has stuck with me after all this time. I loved how the mythologies of many different cultures mix and meld into one great plot. It could have been all jumbled or been completely unbelievable but it worked and it was so well done. The romance also mixes very well with the action.

Keep in mind that this is an erotic romance and the sexy times are plentiful.

 
Rating:

*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review.   My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies   made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the  blog.

Review: The Secret Lives of People in Love by Simon Van Booy

Publisher: Harper Perennial
ISBN: 0061766127
Pages:208 pages
Genre: Fiction/Short Stories 
Challenges-100+ Reading Challenge, Outdo Yourself Reading Challenge
Buy this Book: Amazonclip_image001_thumb_thumb, Powell's, Indiebound clip_image0013_thumb_thumbclip_image0014_thumb_thumb



Summary from publisher:

The Secret Lives of People in Love is the first short story collection by award-winning writer Simon Van Booy. These stories, set in Kentucky, New York, Paris, Rome, and Greece, are a perfect synthesis of intensity and atmosphere. Love, loss, human contact, and isolation are Van Booy's themes. In radiant prose he writes about the difficult choices we make in order to retain our humanity and about the redemptive power of love in a violent world.

Included in this updated P.S. edition is the new story "The Mute Ventriloquist."

My Review: 

I have become a huge fan of Simon Van Booy in such a very short time. This is the third book by him that I have read and reviewed by him and they only keep getting better (Everything Beautiful Began After and Love Begins in Winter ). They were both among my favorite reads of the summer and I don’t see why this one should be any different.

I’m not usually a big fan of short stories. Especially short stories this short. I usually limit myself to novellas and novels. But it was Simon Van Booy. So yeah, I was looking forward to it.  I thought that all 18 stories were so well done. They were very short but long enough to be poignant. It was almost like a series of pictures. A moment captured and then you move on.

I am a huge fan of Simon Van Booy. I love his writing style. It’s so lyrical and descriptive. He has his own unique tone and voice that permeates his books. I am usually not a fan of short stories especially the ones that don’t exceed 20 pages. But I loved this collection even though all the stories were rather short.

I highly recommend you pick up at least one of Simon Van Booy’s books. They all are amazing and you won’t find another author like him. 

Rating:

*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review.   My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies   made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the  blog.

Review: The Ghost of Greenwich Village by Lorna Graham

Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 034552621X
Pages:352 pages
Genre: Fiction/Coming of Age 
Challenges-100+ Reading Challenge, Outdo Yourself Reading Challenge
Buy this Book: Amazonclip_image001_thumb_thumb, Powell's, Indiebound clip_image0013_thumb_thumbclip_image0014_thumb_thumb



Summary from publisher:

In this charming fiction debut, a young woman moves to Manhattan in search of romance and excitement—only to find that her apartment is haunted by the ghost of a cantankerous Beat Generation writer in need of a rather huge favor.

For Eve Weldon, moving to Greenwich Village is a dream come true. She’s following in the bohemian footsteps of her mother, who lived there during the early sixties among a lively community of Beat artists and writers. But when Eve arrives, the only scribe she meets is a grumpy ghost named Donald, and the only writing she manages to do is for chirpy segments on a morning news program, Smell the Coffee. The hypercompetitive network environment is a far cry from the genial camaraderie of her mother’s literary scene, and Eve begins to wonder if the world she sought has faded from existence. But as she struggles to balance her new job, demands from Donald to help him complete his life’s work, a budding friendship with a legendary fashion designer, and a search for clues to her mother’s past, Eve begins to realize that community comes in many forms—and that the true magic of the Village is very much alive, though it may reveal itself in surprising ways.

My Review:

I have been on a reading roll. Almost every book I have picked up this month has been good. There have been no duds. This one was no exception. I loved it. It was the perfect mix of chick lit, fantasy and coming of age.

I loved Eve. I identified with her. I think every New Yorker has been a bit fascinated by life in the Village at one point or another.  I discovered that it’s a nice place to visit but a pain in the butt to live there. I did have some annoyance with Eve. I felt that she used her charm to get away with her mistakes and errors. People who use faux sweetness to get away with their mistakes only make things worse for themselves because they never learn from it. I did like her but that was the one thing about her that really annoyed me. I did love the inclusion of the ghost, Donald. Now he was amazing. I liked him better than Eve much of the time.

I did like this book quite a bit. That’s saying something considering that I read this during the heatwave when my wireless died and my AC decided to stop working. It was literally the only thing that kept me sane. I enjoyed Eve’s story quite a bit. I found watching her navigate her life in Greenwich Village with her career, her ghost and her mother’s past to be very interesting. I did, however, find the grumpy gus ghost to be ever so more entertaining than Eve. Just a little bit. But I did love him. 

Rating:

*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review.   My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies   made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the  blog.

Monday, July 25, 2011

Review: Anthropology of an American Girl by Hilary Thayer Hamann

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau
ISBN: 0385527152
Pages: 592 pages
Genre: Womwn’s Fiction/Romance 
Challenges-100+ Reading Challenge, Outdo Yourself Reading Challenge
Buy this Book: Amazonclip_image001_thumb_thumb, Powell's, Indiebound clip_image0013_thumb_thumbclip_image0014_thumb_thumb



Summary from publisher:

Self-published in 2003, Hilary Thayer Hamann’s Anthropology of an American Girl touched a nerve among readers, who identified with the sexual and intellectual awakening of its heroine, a young woman on the brink of adulthood.  A moving depiction of the transformative power of first love, Hamann’s first novel follows Eveline Auerbach from her high school years in East Hampton, New York, in the 1970s through her early adulthood in the moneyed, high-pressured Manhattan of the 1980s.

Centering on Evie’s fragile relationship with her family and her thwarted love affair with Harrison Rourke, a professional boxer, the novel is both a love story and an exploration of the difficulty of finding one’s place in the world.  As Evie surrenders to the dazzling emotional highs of love and the crippling loneliness of heartbreak, she strives to reconcile her identity with the constraints that all relationships—whether those familial or romantic, uplifting to the spirit or quietly detrimental—inherently place on us. Though she stumbles and strains against social conventions, Evie remains a strong yet sensitive observer of the world around her, often finding beauty and meaning in unexpected places.

Newly edited and revised since its original publication, Anthropology of an American Girl is an extraordinary piece of writing, original in its vision and thrilling in its execution.

My Review: 

I am not intimidated by books of many pages. At all. In fact, I seek them out. I love a book that will pull me in and make me forget that I have plodded through more than 500 pages. This was one of them. I also thought that this was one of the prettiest and most well-bound books that I have ever come into contact with. That automatically upped it in my estimation before I even read a word.

Evie was one of those characters that I could easily have disliked. Very easily, in fact. She was one of those characters who charmed everyone they met almost immediately. She was overly beautiful, overly interesting and completely irresistible to any man she she meets. Yeah right. Gag me. With a lesser author writing her story, I would have been frustrated, angry and disillusioned but Hamann made me like her even though I didn’t want to. I found Evie’s voice to be utterly charming and her story and romances to be interesting.

I loved Hamann’s writing style. It reminded me of The Bell Jar, Jane Austen and Special Topics in Calamity Physics. In that order. I was also happy that there was no boredom with this one. I thought there would be. To be honest. As much as I love big books, it is rare that I find one that does not bore me at all. This one didn’t. Not even for a moment or a couple of pages. I read this one in one very long sitting. I’m known for reading many pages in one go but I read 600 pages in 4 hours. So it kinda had to be good.


Rating:

*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review.   My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies   made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the  blog.

Review: The Soldier by Grace Burrowes

Publisher: Sourcebooks Casablanca
ISBN: 140224567X
Pages: 416  pages
Genre: Romance/Historical/Regency
Challenges-100+ Reading Challenge, Outdo Yourself Reading Challenge
Buy this Book: Amazonclip_image001_thumb_thumb, Powell's, Indiebound clip_image0013_thumb_thumbclip_image0014_thumb_thumb


Summary from publisher:

Be among the first to discover rising star Grace Burrowes, whose searing debut, The Heir, captured awards, rave reviews, and a crusade of fans who can't stop talking about it.

Even in the quiet countryside he can find no peace...

His idyllic estate is falling down from neglect and nightmares of war give him no rest.

Then Devlin St. Just meets his new neighbor...

Until his beautiful neighbor ignites his imagination...

With her confident manner hiding a devastating secret, his lovely neighbor commands all of his attention, and protecting Emmaline becomes Deviln's most urgent mission.

My Review:

I have been delayed by this book because I had no concrete opinion of it the first time around. None.I needed an extra read to decide whether this was a 4 or 5 star book. I usually know immediately but I was completely confused her. I'm still a bit iffy about some things but I do have a concrete opinion.

Emmaline was one of the major reasons why I was having so much trouble forming an opinion. I wasn't sure if I loved her or if I disliked her to the point of gross bodily harm.I decided that I liked her. Her indecisiveness when it came to both Devlin and Winnie annoyed me greatly. But I eventually came to understand her motivations. She also had a secret--that I figured out very quickly--but still it impacts her decision making process. I loved Devlin. He was my favorite type of hero--weathered, tattered, worn and a bit tortured. But in spite of his issues he is still a gentleman and I loved that. Especially to Winnie. He is so sweet with her.

It did take me a while to read this one and I read it twice. It took me the two reads to make a connection with the heroine. Normally, that is beyond my scope of liking a book but not here. I felt as if I was missing something that first time around. And I was. I got it the second. Grace Burrowes' writing is amazing like always. But what I loved the most was that Burrowes did not demonize Devlin's rival for Emmie. As a matter of fact I quite liked him. At times, I preferred him over Devlin.

Overall this was a really great romance novel that I would have looked over if I had not  given it that second read. You probably won't need that second read but definitely give this one a go especially if you liked The Heir.


Rating:

*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review.   My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies   made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the  blog.

Review: Savor the Danger by Lori Foster

Publisher: HQN Books
ISBN: 0373775822
Pages:416 pages
Genre: Romance/Mystery/Thriller 
Challenges-100+ Reading Challenge, Outdo Yourself Reading Challenge
Buy this Book: Amazonclip_image001_thumb_thumb, Powell's, Indiebound clip_image0013_thumb_thumbclip_image0014_thumb_thumb



Summary from publisher:

She may be aloof, and more pretty than gorgeous, but Alani Rivers is the kind of woman a hot-blooded mercenary can't forget, no matter how hard he tries. So when Jackson Savor wakes up next to the naked, sleeping beauty—with no memory of what happened— he knows he's been drugged…even if Alani doesn't.

After she was kidnapped, Alani vowed never to trust another man again. Still, something about this strong, sexy hero with the tender touch makes her want to believe him. As Jackson hunts down a mysterious intruder, he swears he'll move heaven and earth to keep Alani safe. But what really happened that night? And will the truth bring them closer than they ever thought possible—or put Alani squarely in harm's way again?

My Review:

I loved the previous books, When You Dare and Trace of Fear. I was expecting much of the same awesomeness from Savor the Danger. I know it's generally bad to go into a book with high expectations but it's Lori Foster and she never disappoints me. She didn't disappoint me with this one and that's what counts.

I have been looking forward to Alani and Jackson's story since the last book. They had such great chemistry in their scenes in the last book and it definitely continued in this one. Alani was the Molly type of awesome. She was perfectly content ot take care of herself but it was never in a foolhardy way. Jackson was also great. He was also very charming and gentle yet very much strong, gruff and very alpha. He was the perfect complement to Alani. They also had some of the best chemistry in this series and it started in the last book.

This was yet another Lori Foster with an amazing storyline and couple. Alani and Jackson had the best chemistry aside from Molly and Dare. I also loved the adventure and mystery aspects of the story. However, I was a bit confused about the late addition of Arizona. Her storyline was great but I felt that it was shoved into the last few chapters with little build up aside from mentions of her name. It took over the later part of the book when I wanted more of Alani and Jackson. I wish she either had been introduced a bit earlier or had her story mimic Alani and Jackson's with just a few scenes and then more development in the next book. That being said, I am still awaiting the next book with Arizona and Spencer like a rabid fangirl.

Rating:

*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review.   My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies   made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the  blog.

Friday, July 22, 2011

Review: In Her Wake by Nancy Rappaport

Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 046501450X
Pages: 320 pages
Genre: Biography/Memoir
Challenges-100+ Reading Challenge, Outdo Yourself Reading Challenge
Buy this Book: Amazonclip_image001_thumb_thumb, Powell's, Indiebound clip_image0013_thumb_thumbclip_image0014_thumb_thumb



Summary from publisher:
In 1963, Nancy Rappaport’s mother committed suicide after a bitter divorce and custody battle. Nancy was four years old. As one of eleven children in a prominent Boston family, Nancy struggled to come to terms with the reasons why her mother took her own life. After years spent interviewing family and friends, Rappaport uncovers the story of a conflicted and troubled activist, socialite, and community leader. Drawing on court depositions, her mother’s unpublished novel, newspapers, and her own experiences, she highlights heartbreaking stories of a complicated life that played out in the public eye. Inspiring, honest, and engaging, Rappaport’s story sheds light on the agonizing nature of loss and healing, and reveals the permeable boundaries between therapists and the patients they treat.
My Review:

Heatwaves and me don’t get along. At all. The heat is oppressive, the wireless is spotty and there are more bees. Life is never good when there are more bees. I distracted myself by reading this book. Not exactly the cheeriest distraction but a good distraction nonetheless.

I could not put this book down. I wanted to but I couldn’t. Memoirs are a not so guilty pleasure for me. The provide a good break between the romance and YA I am always reading. But it's very rare that I find one that speaks to me as much as this one did. I have not experienced anything similar to Rappaport but I was able to identify with her and admire her and her family’s strength. This was not the happiest book I have ever read but it was inspiring.

I truly admire when writers of memoirs can write about their lives with honesty. I love when there is no glossing over the facts, events and emotions surrounding the, often painful, events of their lives. It takes a fair amount of courage to be able to write about painful events much less to do it accurately and without pretension.Rappaport does it with such honesty and earnestness. I also love that no corners were cut in the storytelling and nothing was glossed over.

This is definitely on my “Memoirs to Recommend” list.

Rating:

*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review.   My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies   made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the  blog.

Friday Events (July 22nd)


 
Cupcake of the week: Cookie Dough, S’mores, Chocolate Raspberry, White Chocolate Raspberry, Rainbow, Blueberry Lemon

Baking for Fun: Butterbeer Cupcakes, Firewhiskey Cupcakes (Cinnamon cake and whiskey buttercream), The Slytherin (Dark Chocolate cupcake with Crème de Menthe—or maybe absinthe), The Severus Snape (Dark Chocolate with a Chocolate Scotch Buttercream)


Reviews posted this week:

  1. Love Begins in Winter by Simon Van Booy
  2. Stiltsville by Susanna Daniel
  3. The House on Blackstone Moor by Carole Gill
  4. Centuries of June by Keith Donohue
  5. The Girl in the Garden by Kamala Nair
  6. The Creed Legacy by Linda Lael Miller
  7. French Lessons by Ellen Sussman
  8. Shut Your Eyes Tight by John Verdon


 

This week's question is:

Name 3 authors that you would love to sit down and spend an hour or a meal with just talking about either their books or get advice on writing from?

Hmm. Jane Austen because she is my lady and I love her unabashedly and without reservation. But I wouldn’t likely get much advice from her. I would just be fawning. J.K. Rowling just because I would want to get the “Dude, How? Why?” out of the way. How can you kill your best character off without dignity reducing him to a simpering lovestruck wuss. Snape was a badass and should have gone out like one. I still maintain that he did not, in fact, die. He is currently living in a comfortable locale where no dunderheads can bother him. Last but most definitely, not least is Georgette Heyer. She is the one I would ask for writing advice because as amazing as Jane Austen is, Georgette made regency romances a genre.

   
Book Blogger Hop

This Week’s Hop
What’s the ONE GENRE that you wish you could get into, but just can’t?

Hmm. I think it’s popular fiction. I hear my friends raving about these best sellers and I try to pick them up but then I remember when I put down a perfectly good romance novel to read The Da Vinci Code and look what happened. Utter travesty. There are some, however, that I would love to read—The Help and Steig Larsson’s series, for example.

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Review: Shut Your Eyes Tight by John Verdon

Publisher: Crown
ISBN: 0307717895
Pages: 528 pages
Genre: Mystery/Thriller
Challenges-100+ Reading Challenge, Outdo Yourself Reading Challenge
Buy this Book: Amazonclip_image001_thumb_thumb, Powell's, Indiebound clip_image0013_thumb_thumbclip_image0014_thumb_thumb


Summary from publisher:
When he was the NYPD’s top homicide investigator, Dave Gurney was never comfortable with the label the press gave him: super detective. He was simply a man who, when faced with a puzzle, wanted to know. He was called to the investigative hunt by the presumptuous arrogance of murderers – by their smug belief that they could kill without leaving a trace. There was always a trace, Gurney believed.

Except what if one day there wasn’t?

Dave Gurney, a few months past the Mellery case that pulled him out of retirement and then nearly killed him, is trying once again to adjust to his country house’s bucolic rhythms when he receives a call about a case so seductively bewildering that the thought of not looking into it seems unimaginable—even if his beloved wife, Madeleine, would rather he do anything but.
The facts of what has occurred are horrible: a blushing bride, newly wed to an eminent psychiatrist and just minutes from hearing her congratulatory toast, is found decapitated, her head apparently severed by a machete. Though police investigators believe that a Mexican gardener killed the young woman in a fit of jealous fury, the victim’s mother—a chilly high-society beauty—is having none of it. Reluctantly drawn in, Dave is quickly buffeted by a series of revelations that transform the bizarrely monstrous into the monstrously bizarre. 
Underneath it all may exist one of the darkest criminal schemes imaginable. And as Gurney begins deciphering its grotesque outlines, some of his most cherished assumptions about himself are challenged, causing him to stare into an abyss so deep that it threatens to swallow not just him but Madeleine, too.
Desperate to protect Madeleine and bring an end to the madness, Gurney ultimately discovers that the killer has left a trace after all. Unfortunately, the revelation may come too late to save his own life.
With Shut Your Eyes Tight, John Verdon delivers on the promise of his internationally bestselling debut, Think of a Number, creating a portrait of evil let loose across generations that is as rife with moments of touching humanity as it is with spellbinding images of perversity.
My Review:

I usually don’t like jumping in the middle of a series and I usually don’t like mystery/thrillers. But sometimes I get the urge to read them. This was one of those times.
I don’t like jumping in at the middle of a series. I always feel a bit lost and like I’m missing something necessary to the story even if I’m really not. I felt like that with this one but not to the point where I did not like the book but more so that I wanted to read more. That very rarely happens. I usually end up so frustrated with the not knowing anything that I just give up. I also loved he development of the plot and its pacing. I was wholly invested in it and couldn’t wait to figure it out.

I thought that Dave was a great character to foIllow through the story. He wasn’t your typical lead in a thriller-type book. Nothing frustrates me more than a Simon Langdon-like character who just happens to know everything about everything with little to no personality to make reading about him any sort of interesting. Dave was intelligent, yes, but he was a bit henpecked by his wife and definitely had some quirks. I cared enough about him to actually want to watch him solve the mystery.

Rating:

*A copy of this book was provided to me by the publisher for review.   My opinion is my own and has not been influenced in any way and any monies   made from associate or affiliate accounts are recycled back into the  blog.
 

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